About Us


About Us

Flora1761 offers a sophisticated nail lacquer collection inspired by the historic elegance of flowers and botanicals.  As varied as the flowers found in nature—from Lily of the Valley to Black Satin Dahlia—our colors evoke a sense of elegance and timeless beauty. 

Our Nail Lacquer promises smooth coverage and a long-lasting finish with lustrous shine when paired with our Essential Primer and Essential Finish.

Just as importantly, however, Flora1761 goes beyond outer beauty: 

8-Free

Without compromising flawless results, our 8-free formula provides a safer, healthier alternative to major brands on the market.  Flora1761 is made without Formaldehyde, Toluene, DBP, Formaldehyde Resin, Camphor, Xylene, Ethyl Tosylamide, Triphenyl Phosphate, and Parabens.

Leaping Bunny Vegan and Cruelty-Free

All of our products are certified Vegan and Cruelty-Free by the Leaping Bunny program (Coalition for Consumer Information on Cosmetics)—an organization that makes shopping for animal-friendly products easier and more trustworthy. 

Learn more about Leaping Bunny.

Empowering Women

Additionally, as a woman-owned beauty brand, empowering other women is also an important part of our ethos.  That’s why a portion of our proceeds go to a respected women’s charity.  We are truly inspired by the countless lives Dress for Success has positively impacted since 1997 and are proud to support this worthy cause.

Learn more about Dress for Success.

Made in USA

Our entire collection is proudly Made in the USA.

 

Our Inspiration

Founder Christine Cameron Koehler was inspired to create Flora1761 while living in London and exploring Europe. Christine, a former fashion and home décor buyer in New York, was consistently fascinated by the influence that flowers have had in so many aspects of daily life throughout history, most especially gardens, historic homes, and fine art. 

One major influence was discovering the Flora Danica—the 18th century documentation of wild plants and flowers in Denmark—which became one of the major milestones in the history of European botany.  Begun in 1761, it is considered one of the first efforts to catalog botanical species and containing 3,240 copper engraved plates, it is a true combination of science and art that both educates and inspires.